How Do I Get People To Notice My Work?

My goal with my photography have always been to spread beauty and joy. Especially sharing those moments, and views, that are rare and not available to everyone. The moments that gets me high on life. You know exactly what I’m talking about, don’t you?

For that to happen, for people to actually see my photos, there’s actually a whole process. Who knew, right? Maybe that is something you have been thinking about. You’re good at taking your camera with you, and you actually take a lot of photos. You want people to see them, but how does that happen? How Do I Get People To Notice My Work?

Lake Mead Photograph by Sagittarius Viking

Lake Mead, by Sagittarius Viking.

I use Fine Art America to display my photos, there’s many other options out there as well, but for any of them to work well, the photographer/artist has to put effort into attaching keywords to each photo, and describe them, in order for people to find them.

Yucca Photograph by Sagittarius Viking

Yucca, by Sagittarius Viking.

I never upload all the photos I share here on my blog, or other social media, I use a very selective process to decide what photos I want to put the extra effort into uploading to my gallery. That’s pretty much it, keywords, is the key. Of course it helps a ton if you network, and share your work on social media etc. Since I just finished catching up sharing my favorite photos on my gallery, writing about this important aspect popped up in my mind. Hopefully it helps someone. I wished I would of known the importance of keywords a long time ago.

I See You Photograph by Sagittarius Viking

I See You, by Sagittarius Viking.

The photos in this post is some of my recent favorites (from the past two months.) If you click on one of them you’ll see what they look like in my gallery, and what keywords I used.

Cold Creek Mustang Photograph by Sagittarius Viking

Love,

Ms Zen

 

Valley of Fire State Park 2

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Arch Rock, Valley of Fire State Park (NV.)

Imagine being inside a Star Trek movie, then you’re pretty close to the experience of Valley of Fire. In fact Star Trek Generations was filmed in Valley of Fire, the notorious Captain Kirk died here. It does feel like you enter another world when you enter this state park.

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I may not be a huge Star Trek fans, forgive me, (I have seen all the  movies,) but I do understand why this location would be perfect. Numerous other movies, and commercials, have also been filmed here.  The park is easy to access, and less than an hour from Las Vegas. If you want to visit, but don’t feel like driving out to the desert all by yourself, there’s companies that have guided tours in the park, that happily pick you up in Vegas, and take you to Valley of Fire State Park.

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Sandstone

These amazing monuments are fragile, and protected. You are not allowed to climb up on top of them (we did see people doing that.)

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There is hundreds of natural caves in the park, and some formations have what looks like huge balconies. With so much housing/protection from the elements already there, it’s easy to see why early human beings choose this place for their home, despite the scarcity of water.

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With every turn of the road, new totally awe-inspiring vistas opens up.

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I think the highest sandstone formation, in the above photo, looks like a huge bird of prey. Can you see the open beak?

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Valley of Fire derives its name from red sandstone formations, formed from great shifting sand dunes during the age of dinosaurs, 150 million years ago. Complex uplifting and faulting of the region, followed by extensive erosion, have created the present landscape. 

– Valley of Fire State Park visitor brochure

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I hope you enjoyed the second visit to this incredible park. If you missed the first one, or simply want to re-visit, you can find the first post here. There will be two more posts from Valley of Fire State Park in a near future. To be continued..

 

Love,

Ms Zen

Amazing Nature – Desert – Joshua Trees

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Joshua Tree, outside Las Vegas (NV.)

Joshua trees are fascinating to look at, standing tall in the middle of the desert landscape. It looks like they are reaching up towards the sky. In fact they were named by mormon settlers, that crossed the Mojave Desert in the mid-19th century. The trees unique shape reminded them of a story in the Bible, where Joshua reaches his hands up to the sky in a prayer.

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Joshua trees in a desert landscape, along State Route 160, in southern Nevada.

These hardy little trees that grows in southern Nevada, southern California, and Arizona  are actually very sensitive to our current climate changes. Scientists believe that their numbers could be reduced by 90% by the end of this century. Which would have a huge impact on the ecosystem, probably more than we can understand today.

Joshua trees aren’t actually trees, they are succulents, a type of plant that stores water. In their dry ecosystems, however, they are considered trees of the desert. They have a complex root system that consists of deep and shallow root. Their deep roots can reach a depth of 10-30 feet (!) and collect water that no other plant can use. Pretty cool, don’t you think?

Joshua trees have been used for wood, and building materials for centuries. I think just looking at them is a treat. The way they reach up towards the sky is such a positive, hope giving gesture. Like they are giving thanks. I think they are  among the most interesting, fascinating plants in the desert. What do you think? Have you ever seen a Joshua tree? How do they make you feel?

It was cloudy yesterday when I took these pictures, and the light was kind of flat. It was a lot of fun experimenting with my new camera anyways, and enjoying nature at the same time. I hope you’re having a wonderful weekend!

 

Love,

Ms Zen