Gardening Project 2019

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Tomato Seedlings

Compared to my 1.3 acre garden in California last year, this years garden is tiny tiny (a corner of a busy backyard, in the City of Las Vegas.) It’s more of an experiment to see what gardening in this area is about, rather than having the goal of producing the majority of my family’s food (that is still my goal for the future, just not right now.)

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Speaking of experiments, these little pineapple plant are definitely experiments. They did not like the fabric pots I first planted them in, none of the fruit trees did. In California I had great success with fabric pots. My fruit trees grew strong roots, and was very healthy. Here in the desert they all dried out, and I might of killed some of them by accident. I repotted the pineapple plants, the fig trees, and the pomegranate trees two weekends ago, into thick clay pots. That will keep the soil cool, and moist longer, without the roots getting water clogged (that’s my hope.) The pineapple plants looks like they will make it. I’m giving the pomegranate, and the figs a little longer, but they don’t look that good.

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Gardening is always a learning curve, and in extreme climates even more so. We’ll see what comes out of my gardening project this year. I do have fun experimenting. I have more, (too many,) heirloom tomato seedlings to plant, and I should do some mulching before it gets any hotter. What’s happening in your garden right now?

Have a fabulous day!

Love,

Ms Zen

21 Comments on “Gardening Project 2019

  1. No garden in my backyard, just a finished yard with new plants and faux grass. My weather station says it’s just 19% humidity.

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  2. Hi, Maria! Here in eastern North Dakota, I am hoping that tomorrow’s rains will melt the rest of the snow covering the backyard garden. I have not yet figured out what wildflowers I should replant. I imagine that many of the annuals dropped seeds that will grow within the next month or so. I hesitate to turn over the soil and risk disturbing the perennials and the insects that have taken shelter in the remains of last year’s stalks. Hope things continue to go well with your new growing space!

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  3. I expect the summer is going to be tough for everything but cactus in that climate. I applaud you for trying and look forward to seeing how things do. The native Americans in the Southwest grew the three sisters: corn, beans and squash. You growing any of those?

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    • Yes, I am sure you are right. If I had a little more space I would plant the three sisters. I love them all πŸ™‚ I was considering it, but thought that I probably didn’t have enough room to plant enough, to have sufficient pollination. Maybe there’s ways to help nature out a little, by hand pollination? I guess it’s not too late to plant them yet. We had a very refreshing rain this afternoon, everything smells so good now. I’m excited to see your garden πŸ™‚

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  4. That’s fun that you’re doing gardening still, even if it is on a smaller scale. Trying fruit trees too, I’m impressed. As for my neck of the woods, I’m awaiting the arrival of a day without snow cover to begin pondering my garden beds and to see what has survived the long winter or not. I’m hoping to start some seeds in the house this year too. Happy Gardening to you!!

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  5. These are great tips, Maria! Our backyard has acidic rocky soil which my pine trees love, but nothing else does unless you count weeds. Hans’ Myers lemons are doing well, most trees seem hardy here. I just started several sunflower seedlings which are doing well in their organic soil. The first batch failed to thrive, probably too cold and over watered. I’m about to plant plumeria and any advice would be welcome. I have clay pots, so that will keep these tropical plants moist.

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    • That sounds just fabulous Terri! Other than mulching mulching mulching, I doubt I have any advice of value to give you. Try different types of mulch, get creative, and see what goes well with you soil. Cedar wood chips, horse, and chicken manure are some of my favorite types of mulch. It makes a huge different, both when it comes to feed you plants, and protect them from heat. During the hot season I water with diluted, 50/50, apple cider vinegar/water once a week. You can dilute with more water, but I’ve noticed that the heat in norcal can take the stronger dose. Best of luck! Looking forward to seeing your photos.

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  6. Pingback: Weekend Coffee Share; Gratitude – Gardening – Zen Strategies – Sagittarius Viking

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